Our unique process and location yield a much plumper and juicier raisin

  • desert scene with cactus and sun rays
  • thermometer next to sun with heat rays
  • chemistry beaker
  • hand picking stem of raisin cluster from the vine
  • open box next to bed of feathers

Highest Quality

Our Food Safety Quality Program is based on Good Agricultural, Handling & Manufacturing Practices, Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points and Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures.

Trimming to perfection

To achieve the optimal size, sweetness, and raisin yield each year, we perform a careful method of trimming and handling to the vine at each stage of the raisin growing process.

Natural Sweetness

Raisins on the Vine require over 22 percent sugar to achieve optimal sweetness of the fruit which is much higher than that of the regular variety raisins which  typically average between 16 - 18 percent.

Raisins on the Vine are hand-picked, washed, carefully hand-clipped and hand-packed to preserve the natural state of the clusters. Quality control is an important part of each step in the raisin making process. Our Food Safety Quality Program is based on Good Agricultural Practices, Good Handling Practices, Good Manufacturing Practices, Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points and Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures. At our packing plant, the raisins are thoroughly inspected by Quality Control and USDA to ensure the production of a consistent, high-quality raisin.

To achieve the optimal size, sweetness, and raisin yield each year, a method of trimming and handling is done to the vine at each stage of the growing process. This method is crucial to the quality of the raisins, and includes techniques such as pruning, dropping bunches, thinning, girdling, and leafing.

During the winter the plant lies dormant waiting for spring. As the warmth of the early desert spring takes effect, buds will form at each node. After three or four leaves have developed from each bud, flowers will start to appear. At this stage, the flowers will have feathery tips. These are the parts of the flower that need to be pollinated to produce fruit. Pollination occurs by wind, so it’s important for the wind to ripple between the flowers. Plucking off all leaves along each cane below the flowers is what is called “leafing”. This also allows for the plant’s energy to go into filling out the grapes rather than into making new leaves. Vines can overproduce which results in degradation of quality. To correct this, the process of “thinning” is done to misshapen and excess clusters.

Mature flame grapes can handle approximately 50 clusters for each vine. As the temperatures rise, the grapes begin to change in color. Depending on sugar levels, the grapes need about one to three weeks after they’ve changed color to be considered ripe for harvest. Table grapes don’t need as much sugar as raisin or wine grapes to be considered ripe. They usually reach between 16 and 18 percent before they are ready to harvest.


Raisins on the Vine require over 22 percent sugar for optimal sweetness which gives them a rich, complex character that compliments sweet and savory flavors. Once ready for harvesting, our raisins are cut and hung on the vine for a natural sun-drying process. Once completely dry, the raisins are kept in storage as they await the hand-washed, hand-trimmed, and hand-packaged process.


We are Kosher Certified by Orthodox Union.
Certified for Passover and year-round use.